Past Events

  1. The Asia and Pacific Museum in Warsaw, Asian Gallery, ul. Freta 5, Warsaw, Poland, July 6, 2011 at 6:00 PM

    • The evening was organized and moderated by the curator of the Asia and Pacific Museum, Maciej Góralski. As shown in the photograph, Maciej gave a consecutive translation of my talk into Polish. Here is the announcement of the talk, translated from Polish by Professor Robert Rothstein, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

      BLINDING PAIN, SIMPLE TRUTH - an evening with Prof. Richard S. Ellis (USA), a graduate of Harvard and professor of mathematics and Judaic studies at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, who will talk about his new book, which combines Buddhist reflection on the nature of suffering with the thoughts of a mathematician and translator of the Hebrew Bible on insight meditation as a path to liberation.
  2. Odyssey Bookshop, 9 College Street, South Hadley, MA, June 16, 2011 at 7:00 PM

    • Drawing upon his experience with recurrent headaches, Richard Ellis will discuss how meditation can empower people who suffer from physical and emotional pain to let go of the image of themselves as victims and eventually to transform their suffering into healing. This transformation is based on the wisdom of the Buddha, who taught that suffering can end. Through meditation, people who suffer from pain can learn how to convert their pain from an enemy into a teacher and to embrace their lives with equanimity, gratitude, and joy.
  3. Private Book-Launch Party for Family and Friends at Home of Sheila and Alan Levine, May 7, 2011 at 8:00 PM

                 
    • My sister-in-law, Sheila Levine, introduced me using the following words. “I am happy to introduce my brother-in-law, Richard. He is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and an adjunct professor in the Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies. Richard has published two books in probability theory and has lectured widely in the U.S., Europe, and Israel, where he and his family lived during two sabbaticals. Richard also has a theorem in probability named after him. Though he has achieved recognition in those fields, he also has expertise in another completely different subject about which he will talk tonight. This subject is debilitating, blinding headaches.”
  4. Public Book-Launch Party at Amherst Books, 8 Main Street, Amherst, MA, April 14, 2011 at 8:00 PM
    • Richard Ellis will talk about his new book, Blinding Pain, Simple Truth: Changing Your Life Through Buddhist Meditation. Drawing upon his experience with recurrent headaches, he will discuss how meditation can empower people who suffer from physical & emotional pain to let go of the image of themselves as victims and eventually to transform their suffering into healing. One reviewer wrote that ‘this book is a mindful & wholehearted exploration of the nature of pain, suffering, & healing that reveals surprising discoveries of simple, yet challenging pathways to equanimity.’ Ellis is a professor in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics & an adjunct professor in the Department of Judaic & Near Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
  5. University Convocation, Willamette University, Salem, OR, February 18, 2010 at 11:30 AM
    • Richard S. Ellis, Professor, Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics (Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst), and Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies

      This talk offers a gentle approach to the universal topic of pain and suffering. Most of us suffer, whether from physical pain, emotional pain or from the dissatisfaction and sense of lack that, as the Buddha taught, are pervasive in our lives. The Buddha also taught a liberating, simple truth; pain is unavoidable, but suffering can end. Ellis explains his understanding of this truth in the context of his experience with chronic pain, which began in February, 2000. He will describe how Buddhist teachings and daily meditation can empower people to heal the suffering caused by physical and emotional pain and eventually to embrace their lives with equanimity, gratitude and joy.